Symposia

Symposium 1:
Nanomaterials for Electroanalytical Chemistry and Electroanalytical Tools for Studying Nanomaterials (details)

Symposium 2:
Hyphenated-Techniques Incorporating Analytical Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 3:
Bioelectrochemistry Returns to the Home of Galvani (details)

Symposium 4:
Bipolar Electrochemistry, from Bioanalysis to Materials Science (details)

Symposium 5:
Photobioelectrochemistry - from Basic Concepts and Materials to Devices (details)

Symposium 6:
Batteries into the Future: from Advanced Lithium-Ion Systems to Novel Chemistries and Architectures (details)

Symposium 7:
Electrochemical Systems for Energy Conversion: Fuel Cells and Electrolysers (details)

Symposium 8:
Supercapacitors: from Double-Layer Electrochemical Capacitors to Faradaic-Based High Power Systems (details)

Symposium 9:
Photo-Electrochemical Energy Conversion: Symposium in Honor of Prof. Jan Augustynski (details)

Symposium 10:
Materials for and from Electrochemistry: State of the Art and Future Trends (details)

Symposium 11:
Corrosion, Passivation, and Protection Strategies (details)

Symposium 12:
Electrophoretic Deposition of Functional Coatings: from Materials Science to Biotechnology (details)

Symposium 13:
Electrochemistry Applied to Cultural Heritage (details)

Symposium 14:
Electrochemical Engineering: Research towards Deployable Technology (details)

Symposium 15:
New Trends in (Bio)-Molecular Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 16:
Micro- and Nano-Scale Platforms to Study Electron Transport in (Bio) Molecular Systems: from Fundamentals to Molecular Devices (details)

Symposium 17:
Physical Electrochemistry: Recent Developments in Spectroscopy, Microscopy and Theory for the Rational Design of Electrochemical Interfaces (details)

Symposium 18:
Theory: from Understanding to Optimization and Prediction (details)

Symposium 19:
Single Entity Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 20:
Interfacial Electrochemistry in Non-Aqueous Electrolytes (details)

Symposium 21:
General Session (details)


Symposium 1
Nanomaterials for Electroanalytical Chemistry and Electroanalytical Tools for Studying Nanomaterials

Sponsored by: Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

The nano era has a growing effect on electroanalytical chemistry and electroanalytical tools can offer a lot to study nano-organized materials. Nanostructured materials can be used for example to modify electrode surfaces, be applied as nano sensors and at the same time be used as a means of studying electrocatalytic processes used in electroanalysis. This is now offering new opportunities for measuring lower concentrations in smaller volumes and with higher selectivity.
Naturally, the implementation of nanomaterials in electroanalytical chemistry is an inherently inter- disciplinary field of research, which requires bridging between analytical, physical chemistry and synthetic approaches. Yet, the benefits of this combination and integration are colossal as it truly makes it possible to design electroanalytical probes on a molecular scale.
This symposium aims to bring together electrochemists involved in different aspects of nanotechnology and nanochemistry to explore the impacts of the nanoscale on electroanalytical chemistry and vice versa to study how electroanalytical chemistry can be utilized for studying nanomaterials.

Symposium Organizers
Daniel Mandler (Coordinator), The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel (mandler@vms.huji.ac.il)
Shuping Bi, Nanjing University, China
Luigi Falciola, University of Milan, Italy
Luisa Torsi, University of Bari, Italy

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Symposium 2
Hyphenated-Techniques Incorporating Analytical Electrochemistry

Sponsored by: Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

The development of electroanalytical devices and methods in molecular and surface electrochemistry is closely related to advances of complementary in-situ spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, such as UV-Vis, infrared, fluorescence, Raman, SEM, TEM, AFM, etc. This combined approach provides a wealth of new information on structure changes and reaction pathways determining and/or taking place during electron transfer and other interfacial reactions. It constitutes the key to establish structure-property relationships. This symposium will gather contributions highlighting recent methodological and instrumental developments in the field, and those predicted to be important in the near future.

Symposium Organizers
Fethi Bedioui (Coordinator), Chimie ParisTech, France (fethi.bedioui@chimie-paristech.fr)
Massimo Marcaccio, University of Bologna, Italy
Fabien Miomandre, ENS Cachan, France
Renato Seeber, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy

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Symposium 3
Bioelectrochemistry Returns to the Home of Galvani

Sponsored by: Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

Bioelectrochemistry for energy conversion and storage:
- Bioelectricity
- Biocatalysis
- Biofuel cells
- Biosupercapacitors
- Biobatteries
Bioelectrochemistry for biosensors and bioelectronic devices:
- Biosensors
- Protein and DNA electrochemistry
Experimental as well as theoretical and modeling of biological electron transfer systems and processes
Electrochemical methods in medical diagnosis:
- Detection of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, oxidative stress based diseases and immune responses, cell signaling and communication
- Electrochemistry of disease targeted molecules and drug delivery systems
- Membrane protein electrochemistry
- Electrochemistry of biological and biomimetic membranes

Symposium Organizers
Wolfgang Schuhmann (Coordinator), University of Bochum, Germany (wolfgang.schuhmann@rub.de)
Fabiana Arduini, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy
Renata Bilewicz, University of Warsaw, Poland
Ilaria Palchetti, University of Florence, Italy

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Symposium 4
Bipolar Electrochemistry, from Bioanalysis to Materials Science

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The concept of bipolar electrochemistry has been known for several decades. However, with the advent of micro- and nanotechnology there is considerable renewed interest in this approach as it has become apparent that there are extremely attractive features of bipolar electrochemistry for completely new applications in areas ranging from analytical chemistry to materials science. The renaissance of this topic over the last ten years includes, among others, studies about:
- Electrochemical (bio)sensors and their arrays
- High throughput screening of electrocatalysts
- Controlled generation of surface gradients
- Synthesis of asymmetric particles
- Wireless generation of electrochemiluminescence
- Unconventional motion of small objects
- Photoelectrochemistry
- Corrosion studies
The symposium aims at giving an overview of the potential use of bipolar electrochemistry in very different areas and presenting directions for future evolution.

Symposium Organizers
Alexander Kuhn (Coordinator), University Bordeaux 1, France (alexander.kuhn@enscbp.fr)
Fredrik Björefors, Uppsala University, Sweden
Richard Crooks, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Paolo Ugo, University of Venice, Italy

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Symposium 5
Photobioelectrochemistry - from Basic Concepts and Materials to Devices

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

The symposium will deal with all aspects of photo-induced changes in electroactivity of biological systems. This includes the study of basic phenomena but also areas of application. The conversion of light into other forms of energy such as electrical or chemical energy has attracted considerable interest in recent years and thus, will be in the focus. Biological systems can serve as efficient examples for such conversions. Combining principles of photosynthesis and enzymatic catalysis with basic ideas of engineering and electrochemistry has already been demonstrated to contribute to recent advances. The symposium aims to bring together scientists from different areas who are working on different aspects of such bioinspired, biohybrid or biomimetic systems or on basic investigations clarifying the influence of light on electrochemical reactions.

The scope of the symposium will include (but is not limited to):

- Photobioelectrodes
- Biohybrid solar cells & biovoltaics (including materials and cell design)
- Photo-bio-inspired mechanisms and biomimetic approaches
- Photobiocatalysis
- Photoelectrochemical fuel production (hydrogen, methanol, formiate)
- Microbial electrochemistry of phototrophs and light-driven microbial electrosynthesis
- Triggering electrochemical conversions by light
- Plasmonic electrochemistry
- Photoelectrochemical sensing

Symposium Organizers
Fred Lisdat (Coordinator), Wildau Technical University, Germany (flisdat@th-wildau.de)
Danilo Dini, University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy
Lars Jeuken, University of Leeds, UK
Frank Marken, University of Bath, UK
Riccardo Ruffo, University of Milan Bicocca, Italy

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Symposium 6
Batteries into the Future: from Advanced Lithium-Ion Systems to Novel Chemistries and Architectures

Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

Modern electronic devices, electric tractions and stationary applications are outlining the global battery market with limitless potential. These potentials are fulfilled only if breakthroughs in novel battery chemistries, nanostructured electrode materials architecture and safe electrolytes are appropriately integrated. If current and emerging issues such as combination of high-energy/power density with safety and low costs are specifically addressed, present and post lithium-ion batteries will revolutionize energy thirsty modern society. In such a scenario, this symposium is focused on recent progresses in the fundamental science related to secondary batteries, mainly advanced materials/components and novel chemistries targeting at safety and sustainability. Studies related to other (applied) aspects of batteries, including solid-state electrolytes, innovative designs and advanced characterisation techniques would also take a major share of the symposium.

The topics include but are not limited to:
- Advanced Lithium batteries: materials and configurations
- Novel batteries chemistries different from lithium based ones (Na, Mg, metal air)
- Novel Flow-batteries
- Smart architectures and integrated systems

Symposium Organizers
Catia Arbizzani (Coordinator), University of Bologna, Italy (catia.arbizzani@unibo.it)
Claudio Gerbaldi, Politechnic of Torino, Italy
Robert Kostecki, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA
Stefano Passerini, Helmholtz Institute Ulm, Germany

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Symposium 7
Electrochemical Systems for Energy Conversion: Fuel Cells and Electrolysers

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

This Symposium includes but is not limited to fundamental and applied studies on functional materials and cell components (e.g., electrocatalysts, ionomers, electrolyte membranes/separators, gas diffusion layers, bipolar plates, etc.); characterization methods and modelling studies for all the different types of fuel cells and electrolysers.
Contributions on the co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to produce sustainable fuels are also welcome. This symposium covers studies on fuel cells, electrolysis and co-electrolysis devices for both low- and high-temperature applications.

A summary of specific topics is reported in the following:
- Synthesis and characterisation of functional materials and cell components for fuel cells and water electrolysis systems for low- and high-temperature applications
- Novel electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction, electro-oxidation of hydrogen and organic fuels, oxygen evolution, and hydrogen evolution
- Electrolyte membrane/separators and ionomers for fuel cells, water electrolysis systems, and CO2/water co-electrolysis systems: synthesis and characterization of polymeric, ceramic, ionic liquid and nanocomposite systems
- Improved understanding of electrochemical processes and new insights into the degradation of fuel cell and electrolyser components in low- and high-temperature applications
- Operando diagnostics/in situ characterization of fuel cells, water electrolysis systems, and CO2/water co-electrolysis systems
- Theoretical studies and computational modeling of functional materials and cell components (e.g., electrocatalysts, ionomers, electrolyte membranes/separators, gas diffusion layers, bipolar plates, etc.)

Symposium Organizers
Vito Di Noto (Coordinator), University of Padova, Italy (vito.dinoto@unipd.it)
Antonino Aricò, ITAE CNR Messina, Italy
Deborah Jones, University of Montpellier 2, France
Hiroyuki Uchida, University of Yamanashi, Japan

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Symposium 8
Supercapacitors: from Double-Layer Electrochemical Capacitors to Faradaic-Based High Power Systems

Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium is devoted to recent progress on high-power electrochemical energy storage systems like supercapacitors. Studies on novel battery-like and pseudocapacitive materials as well as on high capacitance and novel nanostructured carbons, e.g. nanotubes and graphene, and new electrolytes are welcome. New concepts and new symmetric, asymmetric and hybrid devices for applications ranging from micro- to large-size energy storage, with attention to materials and system integration, will be included.

The topics include but are not limited to:
- Energy storage systems on the market: opportunities and challenges
- Hybrid energy storage systems: from pseudocapacitive towards battery-like materials
- Supercapacitor application and integration
- Sustainable precursors and processes and bio-inspired materials

Symposium Organizers
Francesca Soavi (Coordinator), University of Bologna, Italy (francesca.soavi@unibo.it)
Andrea Balducci, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany
Elzbieta Frackowiak, Poznan University of Technology, Poland

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Symposium 9
Photo-Electrochemical Energy Conversion: Symposium in Honor of Prof. Jan Augustynski

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Div. 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

This special symposium is dedicated to photo-electrochemical energy conversion. It includes but is not limited to fundamental studies of metal oxide electrodes for applications in semiconductor and/or plasmonic photocatalytic energy conversion systems and chemical sensors. The scope of the symposium comprises energy conversion processes through a combination of material(s) photoactivity and electrocatalytic specificity, leading to generation of fuels and/or activation of very stable organic molecules. Investigations of thin film semiconducting metal oxide materials, including various doped binary and ternary oxides with improved optical absorption properties, fast charge-transport and charge-transfer are primary focus areas of this symposium.
This symposium honors Prof. Jan Augustynski and his achievements in research, teaching, and collaborating with numerous students, postdocs and scientists from all over the world during his 50 year long academic career.

Symposium Organizers
Robert Kostecki, (Coordinator), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA (r_kostecki@lbl.gov)
Federico Bella, Politechnic of Torino, Italy
Stefano Caramori, University of Ferrara, Italy
Clara Santato, Polytechnic of Montreal, Canada
Renata Solarska, University of Warsaw, Poland
John Turner, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Denver, USA

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Symposium 10
Materials for and from Electrochemistry: State of the Art and Future Trends

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Electrochemically synthesized and electroactive materials both owe their usefulness to the ability to harness redox processes, aimed however at different purposes: synthesis and functionality, respectively. Concepts and phenomena from one could thus be applied to the other, leading to potential synergies and novel insights: think for example of ion intercalation to generate new materials, or inducing functionality by accurately placing active sites. This symposium will cover the latest findings in the electrochemical synthesis of materials, the current status of electroactive materials, and examine the potential synergies derived by exploiting concepts from either. Contributions are welcome in, but not limited to, the following areas:
- New concepts in electrochemical synthesis and electrochemical surface treatment
- Next generation materials by electro-, electroless deposition, and electrochemical surface treatments
- Novel methods for atomic/nanoscale control of morphology and function
- Molecular understanding of additives
- Molecular, supramolecular and electrochemically active materials
- Conjugated and redox-active polymers
- Composite electroactive materials
- Nanostructured and functionalized surfaces
- Carbon nanostructures, e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and graphene, as well as other 2-dimensional materials such as black phosphorus or dichalcogenides

Symposium Organizers
Giovanni Zangari (Coordinator), University of Virginia, USA (gz3e@virginia.edu)
Sandro Cattarin, ICMATE CNR Padova, Italy
Silvia Franz, Politechnic of Milan, Italy
Massimo Innocenti, University of Florence, Italy
Mikhail A. Vorotyntsev, Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Russia

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Symposium 11
Corrosion, Passivation, and Protection Strategies

Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The symposium will cover all aspects of corrosion science and engineering, such as corrosion mechanisms of advanced materials, corrosion processes in harsh and complex environments, passivity and oxide films, localized corrosion mechanisms, corrosion protection by coatings and inhibitors, as well as corrosion and protection in engineering applications. Contributions dealing with theoretical analysis, novel and exploratory electrochemical techniques to study corrosion phenomena, as well as surface analytical investigations on passive films and corrosion product layers are of interest. Research conducted at different length- and time-scales, in order to enhance understanding of corrosion from nanoscale initiation of localized attack to prediction of engineering failures, are most welcome.

Symposium Organizers
Sannakaisa Virtanen (Coordinator), University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany (virtanen@ww.uni-erlangen.de)
Flavio Deflorian, University of Trento, Italy
Shinji Fujimoto, Osaka University, Japan
Philippe Marcus, ENSCP, France
Monica Santamaria, University of Palermo, Italy

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Symposium 12
Electrophoretic Deposition of Functional Coatings: from Materials Science to Biotechnology

Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The symposium is focused on the fundamentals and applications of the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique with emphasis on Direct Electrically-Driven Assembly processes for the development of coatings and functional films involving advanced particle assembly
and packing strategies. The symposium will cover fundamentals and applications of electrophoretically deposited thick and thin films in several areas such as protective coatings, biomedicine, manufacturing of electro/photoactive, electro-mechanic and optical devices.

Topics will include the fabrication of tailored coatings, films and multilayer structures with new functionalities in:
- Transportation and Communication
- Energy Conversion and Storage
- Health Care and Clean Technologies
In addition, contributions that address the in situ characterization of particle surface modification in liquid media, rheology, deposition ordering and kinetics will be considered, and papers which discuss mechanistic aspects of co-deposition will be particularly welcome.

Symposium Organizers
Aldo R. Boccaccini (Coordinator), University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany (aldo.boccaccini@fau.de)
Begoña Ferrari, CSIS Madrid, Spain
Carmen Galassi, ISTEC CNR Faenza, Italy

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Symposium 13
Electrochemistry Applied to Cultural Heritage

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

The physical part of the worldwide cultural heritage is deteriorating faster than it is being conserved, restored or studied. Assets are being lost, or are at risk, through natural processes of decay, environmental disasters, the direct effects of enhanced public access, lack of knowledge in conservation/preservation, and simple negligence. The conservation of cultural heritage is for these reasons both a culturally important activity in its own right and an economic need. A multidisciplinary team (i.e. art historians, archaeologists, curators, conservators, as well as analytical scientists, and other specialists at a basic research level) must be involved in solving this issue.
There are several applications of electrochemistry in this area: restoration of metallic objects from cultural heritage, the use of electrochemical techniques for authenticity purposes or contribute to the development of simple diagnostic techniques necessary for identifying practical conservation needs. Electrochemistry can be used in conservation science as an analytical approach in order to determine the composition of the materials forming the object and, eventually, the products of chemical alterations, adherence, materials incorporated in prior restorations, etc. or as restorative/conservation methods in order to preserve the original state of the piece and/or incorporate protective materials for ensuring its future conservation. Electroanalytical methods can be used for determining the composition of the environment around the object (atmosphere, waters, soils) in an archeological site and for monitoring the composition of the environment around monuments or objects preserved in museums, stores, etc.
A selection of papers from this symposium will be published in the Journal of Cultural Heritage, after peer review.

Symposium Organizers
Susana C. de Torresi (Coordinator), University of Sao Paulo, Brazil (storresi@iq.usp.br)
Christopher Brett, University of Coimbra, Portugal
Cristina Chiavari, University of Bologna, Italy
Kurt Kalcher, University of Graz, Austria
Ligia Moretto, University of Venice, Italy

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Symposium 14
Electrochemical Engineering: Research towards Deployable Technology

Sponsored by: Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

Electrochemical engineering contributions are encouraged on the conception, modelling, design, fabrication, performance characterisation, control and optimisation of prototype electrodes / electrocatalysts, electrochemical reactors and processes. Reports would be welcome addressing, though not exclusively: energy conversion and storage, novel water and soil treatment and other environmental protection processes, porous electrodes for capacitive deionization and other electrochemical processes, novel electrode materials and material protection processes, etc. The complexity of such systems may require computational predictions of their behaviour, using advanced mathematical modelling methods. Hence, such contributions would also be welcome, enabling focusing of experiments, aiding interpretation of experimental data and facilitating optimal design. The symposium will provide a forum to report recent developments and to discuss outstanding challenges.

Symposium Organizers
Karel Bouzek (Coordinator), University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Czech Republic (bouzekk@vscht.cz)
Henry Bergman, Anhalt University, Germany
Maarten Biesheuvel, Wetsus Leeuwarden, Netherlands
Geoffrey Kelsall, Imperial College London, UK
Simonetta Palmas, University of Cagliari, Italy
Onofrio Scialdone, University of Palermo, Italy

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Symposium 15
New Trends in (Bio)-Molecular Electrochemistry

Sponsored by: Division 6: Molecular Electrochemistry

This symposium will cover all aspects of fundamental (bio)-molecular electrochemistry involving organic, organometallic, and coordination compounds to elucidate their electrochemical activity and thus fully exploit it, also designing new trends in applications.
The symposium will cover a broad range of topics including, but not limited to: mechanistic investigations, structure-activity relationships, molecular electrosynthesis, molecular electrocatalysis, molecules of biological interest, mimicking of active centres in biomolecules, electroactive molecules with innovative functional properties, molecular modification of surface by electrochemical activation, host-guest interactions, molecular recognition, multiple redox centers, spectro-electrochemistry. The purpose of this symposium is to bring together the leading scientists working in all the aspects of (bio)-molecular electrochemistry, in order to stimulate intensive discussions and initiate/improve collaborations within the electrochemical community.

Symposium Organizers
Olivier Buriez (Coordinator), Ecole Normale Superieure Paris, France (olivier.buriez@ens.fr)
Christian Durante, University of Padova, Italy
Jiri Ludvik, J. Heyrovsky Institute Prague, Czech Republic
Patrizia Mussini, University of Milan, Italy

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Symposium 16
Micro- and Nano-Scale Platforms to Study Electron Transport in (Bio) Molecular Systems: from Fundamentals to Molecular Devices

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

This symposium intends to gather scientists working within the expanding community of (bio)molecular electronics and related fields, who routinely exploit electrochemical- like approaches in nano- and micro-scale platforms. The symposium will cover all aspects of electron transfer in molecular or biomolecular moieties that profit from an electrified interface and where the electrochemical control has or could find an essential role. In order to put together researchers with very distinct perspectives of molecular electron transfer, the symposium will target studies that range from fundamental approaches, including single-molecule or nanoscale platforms (e.g. SPM approaches, EGain, nanoscale junctions, nanotubes/graphene interfaces, etc.) and computational modelling, to micro-scale molecular junctions involving hybrid micro/nano-structured materials for device applications. Such wide vision of this topic will be achieved by attracting researchers interested on different aspects of molecular electron transport, namely, from physical mechanisms and structural aspects of it, to those interested on potential applications such as molecular transistors, (bio)molecular sensors, sequencing platforms, etc.

Symposium Organizers
Ismael Díez-Pérez,(Coordinator), University of Barcelona, Spain (isma_diez@ub.edu)
Sabrina Antonello, University of Padova, Italy
Angel Cuesta Ciscar, University of Aberdeen, UK
Nadim Darwish, Curtin University, Australia
Giovanni Valenti, University of Bologna, Italy

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Symposium 17
Physical Electrochemistry: Recent Developments in Spectroscopy, Microscopy and Theory for the Rational Design of Electrochemical Interfaces

Sponsored by: Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

The electrode-electrolyte interface defines the performance of diverse electrochemical devices with applications related to energy (conversion, production and storage), water (purification and remediation), (bio-)chemical sensing, environmental and process monitoring, surface protection, optical displays and electronics. Fabrication of optimized interfacial architecture and functionality for a given application requires the ability to control and determine interfacial composition and the interactions between the system components at a molecular level. Recent advances that combine electrochemical methods with in situ/operando spectroscopy, electrochemical scanning probe microscopy, synchrotron-based techniques and theoretical calculations provide a detailed picture of the electrochemical interface at the atomic and molecular level. These lead to an understanding of the structure-reactivity and structure-selectivity relationships that dictate electrochemical reaction mechanisms and kinetics. These are crucial to the design and exploitation of improved materials. This symposium will cover recent developments in experimental and theoretical methods for the understanding and rational design of electrode surfaces, from model electrodes to novel nanostructured electrocatalysts and functional materials.

Symposium Organizers
Robert Hillman (Coordinator), University of Leicester, UK (arh7@le.ac.uk)
Maria Escudero-Escribano, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Alessandro Minguzzi, University of Milan, Italy
Piercarlo Mustarelli, University of Pavia, Italy

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Symposium 18
Theory: from Understanding to Optimization and Prediction

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry
Co-sponsored by the Electrochemical Society

Theory and computational electrochemistry give the promise of achieving both a greater fundamental understanding or characterization of experiments and a prediction of the properties and performance of new electrochemical devices prior to experiment. Based on the advantage of limited cost, they aim to foster the innovation like both fundamental and technology breakthroughs. This symposium aims at coupling aspects of physical electrochemistry to elements of electrochemical engineering, in particular through the use of simulation techniques in strong connection with experimental characterization for validation.

Following topics will be considered:
- Using simulation techniques such as ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo, Continuum Fluid Dynamics, multiphysics and/or multiscale computational approaches for understanding and for the optimization and design of electrochemical cells
- Design of experimental validation techniques
- Methods for determination or estimation of parameters entering the computational models
- Comparison and correlation of behaviors and properties obtained at various scales and using different computational techniques
- Applications include: charge transfer processes, electrochemical interfaces, electrocatalysis, porous electrodes, photo-electrochemical cells, electrochemical cells for energy storage and conversion (batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells, electrolyzers)

Symposium Organizers
Alejandro A. Franco (Coordinator), Université de Picardie Jules Verne, France (alejandro.franco@u-picardie.fr)
Marc Koper, Leiden University, Netherlands
Pawel Kulesza, University of Warsaw, Poland
Claudio Fontanesi, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy
Fabio La Mantia, University of Bremen, Germany
Petr Vanysek, Northern Illinois University, USA

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Symposium 19
Single Entity Electrochemistry

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

Single entity electrochemistry is an important and rapidly growing theme in electrochemistry. It deals with the electrochemical properties of individual molecules, nanoparticles and nanotubes, the use of nanopores and nanopipettes for the detection of biomolecules and single particles, and the study of complex surfaces and single cells at the level of elementary processes and individual surface features.
This new area of electrochemistry thus unifies a wide range of important topics, from electrocatalysis at the (sub-)particle level to bioanalysis (e.g., single cell studies and DNA analysis), bringing together underlying concepts, principles and experimental and theoretical challenges that are common. Significant issues for measurements in this area include the detection and analysis of small (pA - fA), and transient, current signals and the treatment of very large data sets. Further, the interpretation of single entity electrochemistry experiments requires theoretical descriptions that go beyond continuum models for mass transport and reactivity, and consideration of interfacial properties (charge density, double layer, structure, composition, defects etc.) at the nanoscale. There are opportunities for significant advances through the use of in-situ and operando spectroscopy and microscopy methods together with electrochemistry. This symposium will provide a vibrant forum to discuss this area of electrochemistry, bringing together experimentalists and theoreticians across several divisions to discuss a topic that is at the forefront of fundamental electrochemistry and underpins many important technical applications.

Symposium Organizers
Pat Unwin (Coordinator), University of Warwick, UK (p.r.unwin@warwick.ac.uk)
Paolo Actis, University of Leeds, UK
Damian Arrigan, Curtis University, Australia
Stefania Rapino, University of Bologna, Italy

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Symposium 20
Interfacial Electrochemistry in Non-Aqueous Electrolytes

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

Much less attention than to the electrode / aqueous electrolyte interface has been paid to the interface between an electrode and a non-aqueous electrolyte. The latter, however, has become very important in the context of high energy batteries and supercapacitors. Properties can be largely varied by changing the solvent molecules. Moreover, metal deposition from ionic liquids has become interesting for less noble metals. However, fundamental studies of such interfaces are often hampered by the typically limited cleanliness, leading also to a limited reproducibility. In this symposium, recent advances in the experimental characterization, theoretical description and understanding of such interfaces shall be discussed. To what extent are models, which are usually used for aqueous systems, suited for the description of non-aqueous systems? Which physical and chemical properties of a solvent play a role in the characteristics of the double layer and the charge transfer rate? In particular, such topics for non-aqueous electrolytes (including ionic liquids and solid-state ion conductors) could involve:
- Adsorption processes
- Double layer capacitance
- Electrodeposition
- Processes at model surfaces (e.g. single crystal electrodes)
- Charge transfer rates and mechanisms
- Structural characterization (by spectroscopy or scanning probe techniques)
- Electrocatalysis in non-aqueous systems
- Stability of electrolytes

Symposium Organizers
Helmut Baltruschat (Coordinator), University of Bonn, Germany (baltruschat@uni-bonn.de)
Nuria Garcia-Araez, University of Southampton, UK
Alessandro Lavacchi, ICCOM CNR Florence, Italy
Maria Assunta Navarra, University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy

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Symposium 21
General Session

Sponsored by: All Divisions

This Symposium will cover all ISE areas not compatible with topical symposia.

Symposium Organizers
Bernard Tribollet (Coordinator), LISE CNRS Paris, France, (bernard.tribollet@upmc.fr)
Daniel Belanger, Université du Quebec Montreal, Canada
Hua Cui, University of Science and Technology Hefei, China

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